Inspirational Thought for April 4th

“Making a big life change is pretty scary. But know what’s even scarier?

REGRET

Zig Ziglar

Self-Reflection Tips for Youth

  • Be honest with yourself. You don’t do yourself any favors if you aren’t 100% honest with yourself about how things are going and how you are behaving.
  • Notice behavior patterns. We are all creatures of habit. Some of these habits are helpful and others are not.
  • Be able to evaluate your personal core values. If you don’t know what’s important to you, how can you ever grow and represent your best self? Take time to consider what’s most important to you.
  • Be forgiving to yourself. Change is hard and old habits are hard to break. It’s okay. We’re all human. We all make mistakes
  • Keep track of your self-reflection. Start a journal. This will help you when looking back to remind yourself of where you’ve been and where you want to go.

Source: https://www.healthyplace.com/

Inspirational Thought for April 3rd

“In my world there are NO BAD KIDS, just impressionable, conflicted young people wrestling with EMOTIONS & IMPULSES, trying to communicate their FEELINGS & NEEDS the only way they know how.”

Janet Lansbury

What does resilience and grit look like in youth?

What resilience is…

Resilience is the ability to cope and thrive in the face of negative events, challenges or adversity. Key attributes of resilience in at-risk youth include:

  • social competence and optimism
  • a sense of purpose and responsibility
  • attachment to family, to school and to learning
  • effective problem solving and coping skills
  • pro-social values
  • a sense of self-efficacy and positive self-regard.

While the National Resilience Institute defines resiliency based on the 6 following traits:

As an Educator what can I do to enhance resilience

Teachers and schools can enhance resilience through modeling effective behavior and emphasizing positive and social norms between teachers, peers and the academic goals of our youth’s academic/social environment.

Why teaching resilience matters?
  • Resilience enables people of all ages to thrive and take on all that life has to offer, including the inevitable challenges.
  • Resilience is about knowing strengths and calling on them when needed; hence helping develop a growth mindset.
  • Resilience can benefit any youth who may be struggling with their mental health.

In addition, the rational part of a teen’s brain isn’t fully developed and won’t be until age 26. Adolescents are prone to at-risk behavior simply based on their brain development, as result, by building resilience in young people, we are empowering them to be able to learn from their mistakes and to understand that failing is okay – it’s an integral part of the learning journey.

Inspirational Thought for April 2nd

“If they respect you, respect them. If they disrespect you, still respect them. Do not allow the actions of others to decrease your good manners, because you represent yourself, not others.”

Mohammad Zeyara